The Dastyari Scandal: Australia Could Be Turning Against China

This incident, along with the Australian Treasury’s blocking of two bids from Chinese investors to buy up infrastructure in New South Whales, are indicative of the growing suspicion of Chinese influence in the country.

While China was completing the construction of its artificial island chains, the assistant chief of staff to the US Army, Colonel Tom Hanson, spoke publicly to pressure Australia into picking a side in the South China Sea conflict. The US has been trying to build a regional coalition to stop China’s takeover of the region’s fishing lanes, off shore oil reserves, and the $5 trillion worth of trade that passes through maritime shipping lanes.

That was over a month ago, and now Australian politics are hinting towards the continuation of the alliance with the US and the West and away from China. A recent scandal surrounding a high ranking senator, Sam Dastyari, saw accusations of bribery and influence peddling. Dastyari was accused of asking for and accepting money from a Chinese business with ties to the Chinese government to cover travel expenses and a legal bill. Those travel expenses were incurred while Dastyari was on a conference tour in China, speaking out against anyone who would interfere with the ongoing take over of the South China Sea and undermining the positions of the Australian government and his own party. After being condemned by the Prime Minister, he resigned from a prestigious senate position to become a rank and file senator with little influence.

Sam Dastyari steps down from Labor frontbench after accepting money from Chinese donors

This incident, along with the Australian Treasury’s blocking of two bids from Chinese investors to buy up infrastructure in New South Whales, are indicative of the growing suspicion of Chinese influence in the country. This is good news to the Globalists in Washington who are now threatened with a plethora nationalist uprisings in addition to Russian and Chinese expansionism and their own weakened economy.

Right now, the only country that has a lot of capital to invest is China. After agreeing it would no longer manipulate the value of the Yuan at the last G20 in Hangzhou, the IMF announced the Yuan would become an IMF reserve currency in November. It’s a sign that China’s currency is becoming commonly traded and stable, and on track but still not close to replacing the dollar as the most widely used reserve currency. A great number of Aussies are wary of foreign investment, but beggars can’t be choosers and China has the capital.

Australia’s wealthy have watched the developments on the world stage and are not immune to the uncertainty over who will control world energy markets and trade. Billionaire entrepreneur Gina Rinehart, whose business make billions in coal mining annually, has recently placed a bid on one of Australia’s largest beef producers with capital from Chinese investors who were limited to minority ownership. Understanding the need to diversify, Rinehart sees potential in Australia’s ability to produce food.

Chinese investment in Australia

Under the bid, Gina Rinehart’s Hancock Prospecting will end up with 67 per cent of Australia’s largest landholding. But one third of the ownership is to be taken by a Chinese group, Shanghai Cred, which had also formed part of the original bidding consortium rejected by the Treasurer.

Australia is the world’s largest exporter of coal, the fourth largest producer of coal, and also the third largest producer of liquefied natural gas and expected to lead that market by 2020. With the uncertainty around energy markets, climate change policy and green technology, Australia is reacting like New Zealand, Britain, Saudi Arabia, and many other countries who have had to adjust their policies as well as their financial dealings to suit new geopolitical realities.

The West is arranging to tank Putin’s oil-ruble through the climate change debate, but they have not been able to keep pace with the developments rapidly being made in BRICS nations. The Globalists in DC, London and Berlin haven’t prepared a new framework to tie to the value of the dollar now that the Russians are trying to take the world energy market from them. This poor timing, combined with the intensification of climate change policy and treaties, is part of the reason why there is so much uncertainty seen in the markets and governments across the globe. But this course of action by the West has also placed additional pressure on the BRICS system to develop even faster, and maybe not very neatly or cohesively.

Before Monsanto’s reputation was so damaged that it had to be sold off to Bayer, the company that trademarked heroin and produced Zyklon B for Nazi concentration camps, GMO’s could have been the framework that the West was building to replace the petrodollar. GMO’s are designed to be hardier and have more consistent yields, making for a more stable commodity to trade on and pin the dollar to, and the reason I think they were given protections in the TPP and TTIP trade deals.

GMO’s are allowed in Australia with the exception of the state of South Australia, but the view towards them looks mostly negative as many Australian grocers have banned them from their stores voluntarily. If you suddenly start seeing campaigns and NGO’s calling for Australia to trade in GMOs or accept a treaty like TPP, you’ll know that the Globalists still have Australia on their side.

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