Turkey, Russia, and the Geopolitical Endgame of Eurasia

If Turkey decides to turn to Russia and away from the West, it could become the first breach in the wall of containment established after World War II.

If you’ve been paying attention to how badly American and Western foreign policy has performed, you might be wondering just how close Russia and China are getting towards their own geopolitical goals. Forming an alliance with Erdogan in Turkey is a very big step forward.

Turkey warns EU it is making ‘serious mistakes’ over failed coup

Unhappy with the weird, weak response of the West following the latest coup, and the refusal to extradite the alleged leader of said coup to Turkey, Erdogan is now threatening to quit the bidding process to join the EU. Publicly supporting reinstating the death penalty after the coup, a punishment outlawed by the European Convention on Human Rights, it would appear that Erdogan has no intention of mending relations with Europe. He has begun meeting with Putin, has apologized for the downing of a Russian jet and even offered full compensation to the Russian families of the deceased pilots. After reversing policy on Assad in Syria, Turkey is now normalizing relations with Russia. So why is this so important? It all started 112 years ago.

At the turn of the 20th century, the plotters and strategists of foreign policy were still obsessed with controlling sea power and maritime trade with their giant naval fleets. But in 1904, a geographer from the University of Oxford named Halford Mackinder would lay down the foundations for what would soon become global geopolitical strategy. In the Heartland Strategy,  Mackinder stated that the “World Island,” or the combined continents of Europe, Asia, and Africa, represents the catbird seat of the world. These three continents hold the most plentiful and varied combination of natural resources and human populations, and the area of Eurasia in particular was a vital corridor for trade between undeveloped but resource-rich third world countries and the heavily industrialized first world nations. Eurasia was also the door to Africa, a veritable cornucopia of untouched natural resources. But the Heartland part of Heartland Strategy refers to the massive, contiguous land mass spanning between Eastern Europe, Iran, Northern China, all the way to Eastern Siberia. Mackinder considered this area to be the most tactically advantageous with icy seas to the north deterring naval invasions and the bare expanses of Siberia sapping any land campaign. Mackinder’s Heartland, in other words, was the land already being occupied by Russia.

Although it was Mackinder who really first envisioned global strategy, it would be his disciple, Nicholas Spykman, who would deal with the Russians (the Soviet Union) directly. It was Spykman who encouraged the end of isolationism and the establishment of a balance of powers, with the US at the top, after the conclusion of World War II. This detente strategy was centered on the Heartland/Soviet Union, but Spykman placed less emphasis on sea power. Rather than considering a military strategy against the Heartland, Spykman contemplated co-opting the nations surrounding the Heartland, anticipating the expansionist policy of the Soviets, and playing the soft power card that imbues Western foreign policy to this day. This is the groundwork for what would later become George Kennan’s successful containment policy against Communism.

Spykman is a seminal figure in American geopolitical strategy. Having inspired both Henry Kissinger and Zbigniew Brzezinski, his theories and ideas are still very relevant over 70 years later. Eastern Europe and Eurasia are still critically important control points, and just about every effort has been made to keep Russia contained. The official US support of the mujahideen in Afghanistan was an effort to repel the Soviets from the region, and the strategic funding of Wahhabism, Salafism and Islamic fundamentalism by the West and its regional allies has been an effort to keep them out further. The West has never wanted Russia in Europe for fear of a German-Russian Alliance, and the solidification of the Heartland and Eastern Europe. During the Russo-Turkish war in 1878, arguably the war that dealt the death blow to the Ottoman Empire, Russia regained its lost territories from the Ottomans and then began pushing toward Europe up through Constantinople. Britain became so panicked they sent a fleet of warships to stop the Russians before their armies could reach the city. The British and Germans forced the Russians to accept the Ottoman Empire’s truce, and proceeded to split up the Balkan states (now know as “Balkanization”) to reduce the reach of Russia’s influence.

These latest developments between Erdogan and Putin could be seen to represent a continuation of Russia’s expansion from the Russo-Turkish war. If Turkey decides to turn to Russia and away from the West, it could become the first breach in the wall of containment established after World War II. Russia’s goal has not changed, it still wants to gain control over the Eurasian corridor, open up the Middle East for oil exploitation, and integrate the region into the continent-spanning New Silk Road Initiative.

Russia and Turkey Could Form a ‘Big Eurasia’ Axis

Russia and China are now winning the soft power culture strategy, which is ironic considering how the strategy originated in the West and from Zbigniew Brzezinski in particular. Now, Brzezinski’s Trilateral Commission toadies are grasping at straws and Henry Kissinger broke ranks with the establishment to meet with Putin in February and Trump in May. Kissinger, who was Nixon’s Secretary of State and specialist in detente and balance of power strategy, may be suggesting a policy opposed to the uni-polar policies of the Globalists in Washington, London and Berlin.

After Kissinger’s meeting with Putin in February, the Obama administration, the “most transparent administration in history,” announced the very next month that they would declassify certain documents pertaining to the military junta ruling 1970’s Argentina. Guess what was recently declassified:

Kissinger hindered US effort to end mass killings in Argentina, according to files

Could this be the start of another one of the Globalists’ smear campaigns? It wouldn’t surprise me at all.

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